In these days of increased stock market volatility, why is Bob Doll of Nuveen Investments encouraging a long-term view? He discusses his analysis as well as which market sectors look most promising in his weekly commentary. Brian Wesbury and Robert Stein are two economists who share Doll’s view that this is no time to overreact. They describe how a slow-growing economy can be good for investors. Those who worry about outliving their savings for retirement may want to consider a longevity annuity. Ben Mattlin takes a look at the pros and cons for Financial Advisor magazine.

Improving Growth Should Eventually Push Equities Higher– Bob Doll at Nuveen Investments expects market volatility to remain elevated in the coming months as the Fed debates when to start lifting rates and until the earnings outlook improves. The Fed’s rate hike cycle should be gradual (despite a historically low starting point) and he does not expect this will create a roadblock to growth for the foreseeable future. Earnings improvements could begin when companies start to benefit from falling commodity prices. Overall, valuations, positioning and leading economic indicators lead his firm to conclude that cyclical prospects appear favorable for equities over bonds in many cases. Market conditions may remain rocky for some time, but in the end, he thinks optimism will prevail. Read more…

Don’t “Dread” The Plow Horse– A slow growing economy is sometimes referred to as a “plow horse”. Slow but steady.  “Dread”, on the other hand,  is the perfect word for what many investors have felt in recent years. Some have experienced it daily since the bottom in March 2009. Some experience it whenever the stock market falls.  It’s happening again, except this time the bar for feeling dread has been lowered drastically. Payroll employment increased by 126,000 in March and some analysts reduced real GDP estimates to less than 1% for Q1.  Brian Wesbury and Robert Stein of First Trust Advisors explain why this is normal volatility that is mistaken for real economic trouble. Read more…

The Longevity Annuity:  The Long And Short Of It– Longevity annuities are typically purchased by retirees when they are about 65, on the brink of retirement, for a guaranteed payout 15 or 20 years later.  They were created to supplement, not replace, retirement income.  Should you consider one? In this article, Ben Mattlin, discusses the pros and cons.  Read more…

We hope you enjoy reading these articles along with us and that you find them informative.  Please forward this to your friends and family. John R. Day, Bill Ennis, Stephanie Davidson and Matt Heller

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